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  1. #1

    Default Is this possible to be done during disaster?

    Suppose I have on premises private cloud setup done with currently active clients and if tomorrow there's some mishap with the server and the complete network goes down on premises.

    Is there a way to keep the clients up and running by cloning the VMs to off shore datacenter server to avoid the client to face downtime?

  2. #2

    Default

    It is dependent on the entire setup, ability to clone VMs and the platform you are using.

  3. #3

    Default

    Orginally said by "Oswald Coote" It is dependent on the entire setup, ability to clone VMs and the platform you are using.
    I got it, but I am just starting with my business, so what would you suggest?

    So, I will follow your steps.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Posts
    22

    Default

    Can I get some more information on your on-premise solution? So that, I am able to help you. As per your post, I think you are searching for a backup solution which can be turned on and run from when required. There is such a solution but it depends on your current setup.

  5. #5

    Default

    Originally posted by: Wesley "Can I get some more information on your on-premise solution?"
    It's very simple: on-premises setup = open stack with hypervisors.

    You may guide me with the solution now.

  6. #6

    Default

    In general, how do the small companies manage to give backup solutions to clients? Or aren't they ready for such disaster recovery solutions?

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Posts
    105

    Default

    Honestly speaking, most companies do not. This doesn't mean they don't take backups but instead don't have that kind of disaster plan you are mentioning. Several providers will either recreate the failed hardware and restore from backups or wait out a datacenter power or network issue. If you have customers that need to be online 24x7 compulsory then they need not be on a shared hosting account.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Posts
    77

    Default

    To have a strong disaster recovery plan, hot spares in a remote location would be required which leads to additional costs and giving that most small hosting companies plans are quite economical, it's just not feasible to do without seriously increasing prices.

    So this won't be seen in small hosting companies unless they have money to spend, which most do not.

  9. #9

    Default

    Now I got what you'll are saying. Basically, for clients paying 5-10$ a month, shouldn't be taken so seriously.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Posts
    77

    Default

    Originally said by "Now I got what you'll are saying. Basically, for clients paying 5-10$ a month, shouldn't be taken so seriously."
    You need to always take your clients seriously but remember to explain the service well to them to avoid any confusion.

  11. #11

    Default

    This means even a customer who pays $5/month, I disagree.Because if anything fails, he might demand for the backup in real-time.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Posts
    77

    Default

    Suppose you claim a 100% uptime guarantee, even if you only charged $0.50 a month there will be some clients that will expect it and hold you to it.

    So you need to be sure to be very clear of your service levels to your clients and be prepared to answer them.

    Firstly, you mentioned your setup was going to be "in-house". Does your in-house setup also include DDoS protection? If not, add it to your list.

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